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Gray’s Southern Creamed Corn

Gray’s Southern Creamed Corn is rightfully named after my granny, Gray. Creamed corn was a staple on her table and has certainly become a staple on my table, especially during holidays. Aside from the fact it’s the most coveted side dish during the holidays, it adds gorgeous color to the table. Since it’s so versatile and I love it so much I added it to my book, Stacy Lyn’s Harvest Cookbook.

Having fresh corn on hand throughout the year makes my table tasty and beautiful for the everyday occasion, holidays, and special occasions! My Granny's recipe ROCKS!

Having fresh corn on hand throughout the year makes my table tasty and beautiful for the everyday occasion, holidays, and special occasions! My Granny’s recipe ROCKS!

It really takes no time to prepare creamed corn, especially if you’re pulling the base dish out of the freezer. During corn harvest, I put aside a few days to “put up” corn on the cob and creamed corn by freezing and canning it. Freezing your harvest is the easiest, but I prefer canning it for long-term. I freeze a ton of it because it’s wonderfully refreshing to serve during the off-season. 

In the summer I serve creamed corn with other simple sides such as fresh peas, sliced tomatoes and cucumbers, and  fried okra. During the winter months or for Sunday brunch, I love serving this easy pork loin along with the creamed corn and a side salad. It’s gorgeous just to serve the pork on a cutting board, use a vintage piece for the corn, and serve the salad in a simple white bowl with a linen runner down the table.

During the winter months or for Sunday brunch, I love serving this easy pork loin along with the creamed corn and a side salad.

During the winter months or for Sunday brunch, I love serving this easy pork loin along with the creamed corn and a side salad.

It’s best to buy corn when it’s at the peak of harvest. Be ready to use it right away – the same day you buy it – because corn begins losing its sweetness the minute it comes off the vine. For the best flavor and vitamins, preserve the corn or cook it as soon as possible after harvest.

One of my favorite tools to use for creamed corn is my Weston Corn Creamer. Not only does this tool make it faster and more efficient when preserving corn, it actually is the best method for cooking the best, delicious creamed corn.

Welcome to my kitchen Weston Cutter and Creamer! This gadget makes preserving my corn a cinch!

For optimal texture and flavor,

you really need the “milky” substance closest to the cob. For years, I used my favorite knife to get as close as possible to the cob, but nothing beats Weston’s Corn Creamer for getting the most out of you corn and cob. While you do get whole kernels, the creamer extracts the milk and shreds the pulp closest to the cob creating the perfect creamy texture.

 

Making Creamed Corn is so simple and delicious now that I have this handy Weston Cutter and Creamer!

Making Creamed Corn is so simple and delicious now that I have this handy Weston Cutter and Creamer!

I like to use a nonstick skillet when I prepare this recipe. I love my cast iron and you certainly can use it, but the non-stick surface lends itself to a much smoother creamier texture.

To Freeze

On a cutting board, cut kernels as close to 8 cobs of corn as possible. Place the kernels directly into a gallon-sized bag. Press any remaining air out of the bag and lay completely flat. Continue with the next 8 cobs and so on. Stack them on top of each other and place them in the freezer. They should last 6 months to a year. To thaw, lay in cool water for about an hour or until you are able to remove the corn to a skillet.

Courtesy of Stacy Lyn’s Harvest Cookbook.

Check out more great recipes on Meal Plan Monday!

My Granny Gray made this creamed corn recipe a staple in her home and now it's a staple in mine!!

My Granny Gray made this creamed corn recipe a staple in her home and now it’s a staple in mine!!

Gray’s Southern Creamed Corn

 

Gray’s Southern Creamed Corn

Ingredients

  • 4 Tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 8 cobs of corn , cut close to the cob
  • 3/4 cup of milk
  • 4 Tablespoons flour
  • 1 cups cream
  • 3 Tablespoons sugar
  • 2 teaspoons Kosher Salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/2 red bell pepper (optional)

Instructions

  1. In a medium-sized skillet over medium heat, melt butter. Add corn and all its “milk” or the liquid produced from the cob to the skillet. I like to leave one cob cut without the "milk" to add a little "meat" to the creamed corn. Cook the corn for about 5 minutes stirring constantly. If the corn begins to stick add a little water to the pan.



  2. In a medium-sized bowl, stir milk and flour together. Add mixture to the skillet. Once the mixture begins to thicken (about a minute), add the cream and stir to incorporate. Add the sugar, salt and pepper and continue to stir until thick and creamy. Remove creamed corn to a serving bowl and sprinkle bell pepper over the top of the creamed corn. Serve immediately.

2 responses to “Gray’s Southern Creamed Corn”

  1. Donna Oliphint says:

    Wow! You’re the first person outside of my family I’ve found to know about a corn cutter. We got ours from Porter Hardware in Dothan, but they’ve gone out of business. So I was a little worried about where I could get others if needed. Thanks for letting me know the real name! Mom and I have ours set to cut off just the top of the corn kernel and strip out the rest. We’ve always just added a little bacon grease, butter, salt and pepper to ours (some sugar if the corn isn’t naturally sweet), and then baked it in the oven for about 30 minutes stirring occasionally. If it doesn’t thicken enough, we’ll add a little flour slurry. Mom freezes some for winter just like you do. I just buy corn throughout the year from Costco. It’s not quite as good as fresh picked and can sometimes be a little starchy, but it’s always sweet. Thanks for the post!

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