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Re-usable Scallions (green onions or shallots)

Scallions are re-usable!  By re-usable, I mean that they actually can be used at least twice.  After the first cutting of the green hollow part of the onion, you can place the white portion in about 2 inches of water and place them in a sunny window seal then watch them take off growing.  Change the water daily and you will find that they grow very quickly, about an inch a day.

 Almost every culture uses scallions.  They are much more mild than the common onion.  My grandmother, Meme, ate them whole as a condiment on the side of her main dish.  They are used in many Asian and Vietnamese dishes as well as Mexican dishes.
 The white part of the scallion is used for medicinal purposes as well as a culinary purposes.  Scallions are used as an anti-septic, an an-antifungal, anti-bacterial, and expectorant. Scallions treat the the respiratory tract therefore treating the common cold.  It is hard to believe, but scallions even help indigestion and insomnia.  I better go to the garden right now, pull up some scallions and get to munching!  Maybe I will get better sleep tonight.
Oh, if purchasing scallions, look for ones that have a large root system.  These will grow much better.  Happy munching.

2 responses to “Re-usable Scallions (green onions or shallots)”

  1. John Heuler says:

    There is no question that your recipes are top notch, your taste in decorating is, quite frankly, perfect! It seems my suggestion might be trivial, but please hear me out. Your wild game recipes might be expanded to included wild pig (boar). You live in a state that is the capital of big pigs. They are not indigenous and cause a tremendous amount of agricultural damage throughout the country. I’m a nut farmer in both California and Arizona, so I am in an industry that battles pigs. The Texans are fighting a losing battle at this point. The meat is excellent and is easy to prepare, so if you could encourage people to harvest them, it would help the cause.

    If you need nuts (almonds, pistachios, or pecans) to add to those pig recipes, I can handle that.

    John Heuler

    • stacy says:

      You are very right about the damage that wild boar cause. They can be absolutely delicious and they do need to be managed, that is for sure. Yes, I’ll post more recipes using wild boar and I would love any nuts you’ll send me!!

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